Types of uranium dating

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Those which appear the most frequently in talk.origins are reproduced below: Note that these aren't necessarily the "best" or most difficult to refute of young-Earth arguments.

However, they are quite popular in modern creation-"science" literature (even though they should not be!

It looks like this: Most of the other measurements for the age of the Earth rest upon calculating an age for the solar system by dating objects which are expected to have formed with the planets but are not geologically active (and therefore cannot erase evidence of their formation), such as meteorites.

Below is a table of radiometric ages derived from groups of meteorites: As shown in the table, there is excellent agreement on about 4.5 billion years, between several meteorites and by several different dating methods.

A young-Earther would object to all of the "assumptions" listed above.

However, the test for these assumptions is the plot of the data itself.

And from the slope of the line we can compute the amount of time which has passed since the pool of matter became separated into individual objects.

See the Isochron Dating FAQ or Faure (1986, chapter 18) for technical detail.

Rocks of this age are relatively rare, however rocks that are at least 3.5 billion years in age have been found on North America, Greenland, Australia, Africa, and Asia.

he generally accepted age for the Earth and the rest of the solar system is about 4.55 billion years (plus or minus about 1%).

This value is derived from several different lines of evidence.

Note that young-Earthers cannot accuse us of selective use of data -- the above table includes a significant fraction of all meteorites on which isotope dating has been attempted. 286) , less than 100 meteorites have been subjected to isotope dating, and of those about 70 yield ages with low analytical error.

Further, the oldest age determinations of individual meteorites generally give concordant ages by multiple radiometric means, or multiple tests across different samples.

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